Guidance

 

 

WELCOME 2020-2021


WE ARE IN THE BUSINESS OF STUDENT SUCCESS!!

The Guidance Office Staff:

   Beth Rodgers, Secretary 
       (706)986-4322,  Fax: (706) 986-4321
rodgersb@mcduffie.k12.ga.us
                                 
Krista Bonner, (706) 986-4323, bonnerk@mcduffie.k12.ga.us
7-2, 7-3, & 8th grade Counselor
 
       Sherika Beall, (706) 986-4324, bealls@mcduffie.k12.ga.us
               7-1 and 6th grade Counselor
 
 
 
                                     
MISSION: To help students develop the academic, social, and self-management skills they need to be successful.

HELPFUL INFORMATION:

*Career Exploration

*Alcohol & Drug Use Prevention - www.sadd.com www.abovetheinfluence.org
 
*Red Ribbon Week in October
 
                  *Family Communication Tips:
  1. Speak in a calm voice.
  2. Say what you mean and be prepared to listen.
  3. Try not to interrupt the other person.
  4. Avoid sarcasm, whining, threats or yelling.
  5. Don't make personal attacks or be demeaning.
  6. Don't think your answer is the only answer.
  7. Try not to use works like "always" or "never".
  8. Deal with the "now", not the past.
  9. Don't try to get the last word.
  10. If things get too heated, take a break and come back to the discussion later.
  11. Make allowances for the other person.  Parents: Remember what it was like to be a teen.  Teen:  Remember that parents frequently react strongly because they know the stakes are high.  //  Acknowledge that you are in this together.  Build on your communication successes to address other subjects.
  12. Parents:  Take time to eat with your child(ren) and listen to them talk about their day.
  13. Parents:  Plan a study time to help your child with homework everyday.
                             *Seven Test Taking Tips:
  1. Use slow breathing to relax.
  2. If you begin to get too anxious, repeat slow breathing and picture your "Safe Place" for a moment to break the stress cycle.  Focus on your test taking strategy.
  3. Look over the entire test to determine how long it is and where the most points are.  Determine a time limit for each section.
  4. If you use acronyms, or other memory aids, write them down on a scratch piece of paper.
  5. Answer the easy questions first.  Often these questions will have clues to harder questions.
  6. Go back to the harder questions.  Look for clues.  Eliminate any obvious wrong answers.  If you are still not sure of the correct answer, take your best educated guess.
  7. Budget your time so that you have a few mintes left at the end to check your answers.  Make sure you do not leave any blank.  


               *Student Registration Requirements:
  1. Withdrawal Form
  2. Discipline Report
  3. Standardized Test Scores (CRCT, MGWA)
  4. Most recent report card
  5. Elementary and/or Middle School Transcript
  6. Complete Immunization Record
  7. Proof of Residency (1. a lease or rental agreement, property tax statement, or homeownership title; AND 2. a current utility bill (a telephone bill will not be accepted)

             *Student Withdrawal Suggestion:
 Contact us at least 24 hours before the last day at T-MMS.

Tutoring Sessions available Online!
Get 2 hours free of charge, then after that you can set-up payment plans that best fit your needs. Take a look at this site if you are in need of some online tutoring.
Virtual Education Day Game from the Augusta Green Jackets. Go to GreenJacketsBaseball.com
Math: Must Reads From Education Week
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Math: Must Reads from Education Week

 

 

 

How One District Is Raising Math Rigor and Achievement for Students of Color
The Long Beach, Calif., school district is deploying a multifaceted strategy to put more students of color in high-level math courses and help them succeed. Learn More.
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Subscribe to Education Week for complete access to our coverage on this topic.
Math: Must Reads From Education Week
Stenhouse
EDUCATION WEEK
 
Math: Must Reads from Education Week

 

 

 

How One District Is Raising Math Rigor and Achievement for Students of Color
The Long Beach, Calif., school district is deploying a multifaceted strategy to put more students of color in high-level math courses and help them succeed. Learn More.
fb   in   tw   g+
Sponsor Content from Stenhouse
Building Fact Fluency Through Deep Conceptual Understanding
Math specialist Graham Fletcher notes "Fact fluency is not an add-on-it's an integral part of learning arithmetic with deep understanding." Read more.

 

 

 
Five Tips for Using Video to Ease Chronic Math Anxiety
To combat math confusion and frustration, a team of three teachers records daily videos summarizing lessons and running through example problems. Learn More.
 

 

 

Boys' and Girls' Brains the Same When It Comes to Math
Boys and girls start out on the same biological footing when it comes to math, according to the first neuroimaging study of math gender differences in children. Learn More.
 

 

 

 
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OPINION
Designing Rich (Math) Projects That Inspire
 

 

In Math, Teachers' Unconscious Biases May Be More Subtle Than You Think    

 

 
 

 

ADVERTISEMENT
 
Subscribe to Education Week for complete access to our coverage on this topic.